Mike Wallace…the end of an era.

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Mike Wallace, the 93-year-old pit bull of CBS’ ”60 Minutes,” died today.

CBS a lauded Wallace’s brazen brand of reporting, which ”made his name synonymous with the tough interview, a style he practically invented for television more than half a century ago.”

More than any other broadcast network, CBS has been most closely associated with its broadcast news team, which over the years has boasted such heavyweights as Edward R. Murrow and Walter Cronkite as well as Wallace. Each of the newsmen helped define CBS as a beacon for serious journalism.

“All of us at CBS News and particularly at ’60 Minutes’ owe so much to Mike,” Jeff Fager, chairman of CBS News and a longtime executive producer of “60 Minutes,” said in a statement. ”Without him and his iconic style, there probably wouldn’t be a ’60 Minutes.’ There simply hasn’t been another broadcast journalist with that much talent. It almost didn’t matter what stories he was covering, you just wanted to hear what he would ask next.”

Wallace’s tenacious spirit and blistering questions helped to build “60 Minutes” into a ratings juggernaut, and establish the program as the gold standard for broadcast journalism. ”60 Minutes” has logged an unprecedented 23 seasons in Nielsen’s annual ranking of 10 most popular programs.

The durability of “60 Minutes” proves that viewers continue to have an appetite for hard-hitting newscasts. The program still thrives in an era when the format that inspired it — the once-a-week newsmagazine – has lost relevance with the immediacy of the Internet.

Wallace honed his interview style on the ABC network TV news program, “The Mike Wallace Interview.” He also experimented on a local New York television guest show called “Night Beat.”  

“Wallace’s relentless questioning of his subjects proved to be a compelling alternative to the polite chit-chat practiced by early television hosts,” CBS said in its statement.

Wallace’s last appearance on television was in January 2008. His sit-down interview on “60 Minutes” with baseball pitching legend Roger Clemens, who stood accused of using steroids, made front-page news.  It was a fitting finale that served to underscore Wallace’s legacy.

Andy Rooney’s Last Show on 60 Minutes

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Sunday will be Andy Rooney’s last regular appearance on “60 Minutes,” CBS News announced Tuesday. Rooney, 92, will deliver his 1,097th original essay for the broadcast and then make the announcement.

The show will feature a segment with Morley Safer interviewing Rooney and will reflect on the award-winning career of the writer, essayist and commentator, according to a press release from the network.

“There’s nobody like Andy, and there never will be. He’ll hate hearing this, but he’s an American original,” CBS News Chairman Jeff Fager said. I certainly agree and will miss his take on things.

Rooney’s commentaries and essays have been featured on “60 Minutes” since 1978; he joined CBS in 1949 as a writer for “Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts.”

He attended Colgate University until he was drafted into the Army in 1941. In February 1943, he was one of six correspondents who flew with the 8th Air Force on the first American bombing raid over Germany. Last year, Rooney received the Overseas Press Club of America President’s Award for these reports.