7 Things Highly Productive People Do

Multi task

Ilya Pozin wrote this for Inc. Online a couple of years back; I read it again and I began to worry…I need to focus! With my new company in full swing and zero full time staff I thought I better re-learn to focus.

“We all probably don’t want to admit it but we love distractions. In fact, just like monkeys, you get a shot of dopamine every time something pulls you in another direction. Why do you think you check your email so much?”

Want to be more productive and get your focus back? There are no secret tricks here… do one thing at a time. Stop multitasking—it’s just another form of distraction.

Easier said than done, I know. I have been trained working for large firms that muliti-tasking was a skill and an asset.

Before Ilya wrote her story she sat down with Tony Wong, a project management blackbelt whose client list includes Toyota, Honda, and Disney, to name a few. He’s an expert in keeping people on task.

Here are his tips for staying productive:

1) Work backwards from goals to milestones to tasks.

Writing “launch company website” at the top of your to-do list is a sure way to make sure you never get it done. Break down the work into smaller and smaller chunks until you have specific tasks that can be accomplished in a few hours or less: Sketch a wireframe, outline an introduction for the homepage video, etc. That’s how you set goals and actually succeed in crossing them off your list.

2) Stop multi-tasking.

No, seriously—stop. Switching from task to task quickly does not work. In fact, changing tasks more than 10 times in a day makes you dumber than being stoned. When you’re stoned, your IQ drops by five points. When you multitask, it drops by an average of 10 points, 15 for men, five for women (yes, men are three times as bad at multitasking than women).

3) Be militant about eliminating distractions.

Lock your door, put a sign up, turn off your phone, texts, email, and instant messaging. In fact, if you know you may sneak a peek at your email, set it to offline mode, or even turn off your Internet connection. Go to a quiet area and focus on completing one task.

4) Schedule your email.

Pick two or three times during the day when you’re going to use your email. Checking your email constantly throughout the day creates a ton of noise and kills your productivity.

5) Use the phone.

Email isn’t meant for conversations. Don’t reply more than twice to an email. Pick up the phone instead. This goes for texting as well.

6) Work on your own agenda.

Don’t let something else set your day. Most people go right to their emails and start freaking out. You will end up at inbox-zero, but accomplish nothing. After you wake up, drink water so you rehydrate, eat a good breakfast to replenish your glucose, then set prioritized goals for the rest of your day.

7) Work in 60 to 90 minute intervals.

Your brain uses up more glucose than any other bodily activity. Typically you will have spent most of it after 60-90 minutes. (That’s why you feel so burned out after super long meetings.) So take a break: Get up, go for a walk, have a snack, do something completely different to recharge. And yes, that means you need an extra hour for breaks, not including lunch, so if you’re required to get eight hours of work done each day, plan to be there for 9.5-10 hours.

Well now if I can follow these tips maybe I can overcome that fact that I have zero staff and get something extraordinary done.

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3 thoughts on “7 Things Highly Productive People Do

  1. Interesting concepts, well-said.  Of course, you don’t need to pay attention to these things if you work for the government [like I do currently] because nothing ever gets accomplished anyway!  [Not really true, it just seems that way a good part of the time….]

  2. I can personally attest to all seven of those being good suggestions.  Working remotely (12 timezones away from my boss) has given me lots of opportunities to improve my productivity, mostly by learning that email is generally the source of most un-productivity.

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