“Manhattanhenge”

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What will future civilizations think of Manhattan Island when they dig it up and find a carefully laid out network of streets and avenues? Surely the grid would be presumed to have astronomical significance, just as we have found for the pre-historic circle of large vertical rocks known as Stonehenge, in the Salisbury Plain of England. For Stonehenge, the special day is the summer solstice, when the Sun rises in perfect alignment with several of the stones, signaling the change of season.

For Manhattan, a place where evening matters more than morning, that special day comes twice a year. For 2012 they fall on May 29th, and July 12th, when the setting Sun aligns precisely with the Manhattan street grid, creating a radiant glow of light across Manhattan’s brick and steel canyons, simultaneously illuminating both the north and south sides of every cross street of the borough’s grid. A rare and beautiful sight. These two days happen to correspond with Memorial Day and Baseball’s All Star break. Future anthropologists might conclude that, via the Sun, the people who called themselves Americans worshiped War and Baseball.

For these two days, as the Sun sets on the grid, half the disk sits above and half below the horizon. The day after, May 30th, and the day before, July 11, also offer Manhattanhenge moments, but at sunset, you instead will find the entire ball of the Sun on the horizon.

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Fail Big; A lesson from Sara Blakely the Founder of Spanx.

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Sara Blakely joined The Forbes Rich List thanks to founding Spanx. Here is a lesson learned from Sara’s journey from fax machine saleswoman to entrepreneurial superstar.

Fail Big.

Sara’s beloved father followed Wayne Dyer’s guidance in teaching his children the power of failing big. Each day, her father would ask, “So, what did you fail at today.” And if there were no failures, Dad would be disappointed.

Focusing on failing big allowed Sara to understand that failure is not an outcome, but involves a lack of trying, not stretching yourself far enough out of your comfort zone and attempting to be more than you were the day before. Failing big was a good thing.

Nasa’s New Era.

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Opening a new, entrepreneurial era in spaceflight, a ship built by a billionaire businessman sped toward the International Space Station with a load of groceries and other supplies after an early Tuesday blastoff.

The launch of the Falcon 9 rocket and its unmanned Dragon capsule marked the first time a commercial spacecraft has been sent to the orbiting outpost.

The rocket lifted off just before 4 a.m. and smoothly boosted the capsule into orbit. The capsule is expected to rendezvous with the space station within days, delivering a half-ton of provisions for its six crew members.

It is considered just a test flight, but if all goes well with this mission and others like it, commercial spaceships could be carrying astronauts to and from the space station in three to five years.

“Falcon flew perfectly!!” billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk, founder of the SpaceX company, said via Twitter. “Feels like a giant weight just came off my back.” Musk told reporters: “For us, it’s like winning the Super Bowl.”
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Up to now, flights to the space station were something only major governments had done. NASA is looking to the private sector to take over flights to the space station now that the space shuttle has been retired. Several U.S. companies are vying for the opportunity.

“The significance of this day cannot be overstated,” said a beaming NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. “It’s a great day for America. It’s actually a great day for the world because there are people who thought that we had gone away, and today says, ‘No, we’re not going away at all.'”

Since the shuttle’s retirement last summer, American astronauts have been hitching rides to the space station aboard Russian rockets, and Russian, Japanese and European ships have been delivering supplies. Yikes, the US astronauts hitch hikers!

Isn’t that a false sense of budget cutting as all the jobs to build those rockets in Russia and Japan are not here at home.

At least space X is here in the good old USA. SpaceX has spent more than $1 billion on the project.

The rocket also blasted into orbit around the Earth the ashes of more than 300 people, including Mercury astronaut Gordon Cooper and actor James Doohan, who played Scotty on “Star Trek.” The ashes were in a part of the rocket that was jettisoned during the climb into space.